Intel details the Arc A-Series desktop GPU specifications

Intel details the Arc A-Series desktop GPU specifications

Intel’s push into desktop GPUs is getting more developed and the company has finally revealed more about the Arc A-Series. As Intel itself says, it has been “dropping breadcrumbs” but has now finally given us a clearer picture of what to expect.

To help differentiate the different tiers of GPU, Intel is going to take a similar naming approach to its CPUs. Where Intel Core CPUs are labeled as i3, i5, and i7, the Arc A-Series will similarly be monikered as Intel Arc A 3, 5, and 7.

Intel Arc A-Series specs

In a similar fashion to the CPU lineup, the number corresponds to its performance. The entry-level Arc 3 GPUs are for what Intel is calling “enhanced gaming” which doesn’t really say a lot. It’s obviously an entry-level product, as seen by the first desktop graphics card, the A380, having just 8 Xe cores. Enhanced likely means it’s a step up from the integrated Intel graphics attached to its CPUs.

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In the middle, the Arc 5 GPUs are targeted at “advanced gaming” and with the jump to 24 Xe cores on the A580 you can expect significant performance gains over the A380. The Arc 7 GPUs are going to be Intel’s top-tier products, with the A750 and A770 having 28 and 32 Xe cores respectively.

Intel Arc A-Series specs

Intel’s listed clock speeds are not a fixed frequency, either, but rather the claimed average speed across a variety of light and intensive workloads. The double value listed for the Arc A770 VRAM also has good reason. Partners making the A770 will most likely be producing versions with 8GB GDDR6 memory. Intel’s own special edition A770 though will come with 16GB, throwing out the absolute best that Arc currently has to offer. There will also be an A750 special edition by Intel, too.

Specs are only half the story, though, and Intel is quick to point out that the latest features gamers want will also come as part of Arc. Every Arc A-Series GPU will support ray tracing, Xess upscaling, HDR, variable refresh rate, customizable performance, and dedicated video encoding hardware. It all sounds pretty good, but until we actually get to play with these things, final judgment must be reserved.

When that is going to be is still up in the air. Intel is yet to reveal official availability, so the wait must continue. Check out Intel’s Q&A video to find out more.

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Richard Devine
Richard Devine

Editor at XDA, I've been covering tech for over a decade from mobile to gaming and everything in between. Direct enquiries to [email protected]

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