Paranoid Android releases Android 11 custom ROMs for the OnePlus 8 and OnePlus 8 Pro

Paranoid Android releases Android 11 custom ROMs for the OnePlus 8 and OnePlus 8 Pro

Back in April this year, the team behind the Paranoid Android custom ROM had announced their Android 10 stable releases in the form of Paranoid Android Quartz. Now, the team is happy to announce that the official Paranoid Android “Ruby” based on Android 11 is here, with alpha builds available for the OnePlus 8 and 8 Pro.


This new release not only bumps up the Android version, but it also brings along the November 2020 security patches. For the OnePlus 8 series, the initial builds require the latest OxygenOS Open Beta firmware, so don’t forget to flash them beforehand.

Download Paranoid Android Ruby Alpha 1 based on Android 11 for the OnePlus 8/8 Pro

The team warns that the current state of the ROM is far from being a daily driver and hence, has made the builds officially available with the “alpha” tag. Here is the list of known bugs at this time:

  • Initial FOD related bugs.
  • Auto brightness reversed.
  • Dimensions are not perfect.

OnePlus 8 Forums ||| OnePlus 8 Pro Forums

Take note that while the builds for the OnePlus 8 and the 8 Pro are unified, it is not compatible with the OnePlus 8T as of yet. As for the features, the ROM ships with its own custom recovery environment. You also get some of the usual customizations, adjustments, and improvements over stock Android that PA is known for. At this time, there aren’t many additional settings though.

Paranoid Android uses the Code Aurora Forum (CAF) Android base as the foundation for building the ROM. The existence of CAF is one of the many reasons why Android smartphones using Qualcomm SoCs are so popular with the aftermarket development community. While the GPLv2 license does mandate that vendors release their kernel sources, that isn’t always enough for creating custom ROMs based on AOSP. This is not required for chipset vendors, but Qualcomm often provides the public part of their chipset specific code for HALs, framework branches, and more which is a great benefit for third-party developers.

About author

Skanda Hazarika
Skanda Hazarika

DIY enthusiast (i.e. salvager of old PC parts). An avid user of Android since the Eclair days, Skanda also likes to follow the recent development trends in the world of single-board computing.