Google adds new Ultra-Wideband settings toggle to Pixel 6 Pro

Google adds new Ultra-Wideband settings toggle to Pixel 6 Pro

The Pixel 6 Pro is the first phone from Google to support Ultra-Wideband, a wireless technology that allows more precise positioning and location than standard Bluetooth signals. Google hasn’t built many features for the Pixel 6 Pro yet to take advantage of this hardware capability, but now you can turn it off if you really want to.

Google’s December 2021 update for the Pixel 6 Pro, which the company stopped rolling out a few days ago due to software bugs, includes a new settings toggle for Ultra-Wideband. As pointed out by 9to5Google, the new option is located in the Settings app, under Connected devices > Connection preferences.

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Ultra-Wideband settings option

Credit: 9to5Google

The only functionality on the Pixel 6 Pro that uses Ultra-Wideband is Nearby Share, which enables more accurate positioning, but only if the other device is a Pixel 6 Pro (or presumably, other Android devices in the future). As a result, there’s not really any point in turning it off or on right now, except as a troubleshooting step if Nearby Share stops working correctly. But hey, if you’ve been anxiously waiting for a new toggle in the Settings app, here you go.

The new toggle is part of the December Feature Drop for the Pixel 6 Pro, which is on hold until sometime in “late January,” according to Google. That update also includes a new Conversation mode for the Sound Amplifier, as well as car crash detection in more regions and a new option for adjusting the Google Assistant button’s activation duration. The update mainly served to bring features from the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro to older devices, so there’s not much to get excited about if you already have Google’s latest and greatest — except security fixes, anyway.

Let us know in the comments section how this new settings toggle has enriched your life. I don’t own a Pixel 6 Pro myself, but I know if I did have one, I wouldn’t be able to contain my excitement for a toggle that didn’t really do anything.

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Corbin Davenport
Corbin Davenport

Corbin is a tech journalist and software developer. Check out what he's up to at corbin.io.

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