Razer launches the Huntsman V2 keyboard with an 8000Hz polling rate

Razer launches the Huntsman V2 keyboard with an 8000Hz polling rate

Razer is on a roll with its product launches, and today the company introduced the Huntsman V2 wired gaming keyboard. As you’d expect, this new version builds on previous iterations of the Huntsman, but it now includes 2nd-generation Razer linear optical switches for faster actuation, along with other improvements. To clarify, this isn’t the first model to show up with the name Huntsman V2, as we already have the Huntsman V2 Analog, a keyboard where each key can detect varying levels of pressure. This new model uses more standard optical switches.

Razer’s optical switches are unique compared to traditional gaming keyboards, as they use an infrared light beam to activate the switch. Because of this, there’s no debounce delay, something mechanical keyboard usually have to ensure that each signal activation is an actual keypress.

Razer says this allows the keys to respond even faster, and to go along with that, the Huntsman V2 comes with an 8000Hz polling rate, meaning it can check for any user action 8000 times per second to reduce input delay even further. Razer already had a mouse with an 8000Hz polling rate, which was fittingly named the Viper 8KHz, so it’s not too surprising to see it come to keyboards. Razer only mentions these improvements for its red linear optical switches, though, and you can still get the Huntsman V2 with purple clicky switches if you prefer those. However, you may not feel the benefits of the higher polling rate.

Red linear switches and purple clicky switches available inside the Razer Huntsman V2

Aside from the improved actuation times, the new switches also add a silicon sound dampener to reduce the sound when a key bottoms out. More lubricant has also been applied to the switches and stabilizers to make the typing experience even quieter. Just like before, the keys are rated to live through 100 million keystrokes.

The Razer Huntsman V2 also comes with some features we’ve seen in the company’s other keyboards, like doubleshot PBT keycaps that don’t become shiny or fade over time, so you can see the key labels for longer. This model also adds a multi-functional dial and four media keys, something previous Huntsman models didn’t have but other Razer keyboards did. In terms of build quality, an aluminum top plate should ensure the Huntsman V2 feels sturdy. There’s also an included wrist rest so your hands are more comfortable during long periods of use.

Multi-function dial and media control keys

And of course, it wouldn’t be a Razer keyboard without support for Chroma RGB lighting, which you can customize with Razer Synapse. This model also includes 7 preset lighting patterns so you don’t have to think about it too much. You can save your settings such as key customization and macros using five onboard profiles, and you can switch between them on the fly.

Alongside the standard Huntsman V2, Razer is also launching the Huntsman V2 TKL, incorporating the core features of the keyboard into a tenkeyless design. That means you lose the number pad and the dedicated media controls, but the keyboard is much more compact as a result.

Razer Huntsman V2 TKL

The Razer Hunstman V2 and V2 TKL are available today. The former starts at $189.99 or €199.99 with clicky purple switch, while the latter starts at $149.99/€159.99. If you want the red linear switches, you’ll need to pay an extra $10/€10. You can buy the keyboard below. If you prefer gaming with a controller, Razer also announced the Wolverine V2 earlier this week.

    Razer Huntsman V2
    The Razer Huntsman V2 features 2nd-generation Razer linear optical switches, new sound dampening mechanisms, programmable keys and Chroma RGB lighting. it also includes media controls and a multi-function dial.
    Razer Huntsman V2 TKL
    The Razer Huntsman V2 features 2nd-generation Razer linear optical switches, new sound dampening mechanisms, programmable keys and Chroma RGB lighting. This is the tenkeyless variant, which has a more compact design without a number pad or dedicated media controls.

About author

João Carrasqueira
João Carrasqueira

Writer at XDA Computing. I've been covering the world of technology since 2018, but I've loved the field for a lot longer. And I have a weird affinity for Nintendo videogames, which I'm always happy to talk about.