Razer’s Hammerhead True Wireless V2 earbuds come with Chroma RGB

Razer’s Hammerhead True Wireless V2 earbuds come with Chroma RGB

Today, Razer held a Razer Store Live event where it introduced a handful of brand-new products. Among them were the Razer Hammerhead True Wireless V2 earbuds, which come as a successor to the 2019 model and offer some notable improvements.

The most notable of those improvements is support for active noise cancellation (ANC), which is borrowed from the Hammerhead Pro the company released last December. ANC uses two noise-canceling microphones to detect background noise and remove it so you can hear your content or calls better. Additionally, there’s a Quick Attention mode, which actually raises the volume of your surroundings so you can listen to other people without taking the earbuds off. However, the earbuds don’t have the THX certification that the Pro model has.

What the Razer Hammerhead V2 add that’s completely new is support for Razer Chroma RGB. Yes, if you just can’t get enough of showing off, you can now choose from 16.8 million colors to have in the Razer logo on the earbuds. Since the earbuds are in your ears, you won’t be seeing this yourself, but after all Razer calls this the  “ultimate wireless earbud flex”, so the purpose of this feature is clear. Of course, gaming mode is still available, too, bringing latency as low as 60ms for games that may require quick reactions.

Razer Hammerhead True Wireless (2nd Gen)

One of the biggest improvements of this release is the battery life. The original Hammerhead earbuds only promised 16 hours of battery life in total, and the Pro model took that up to 20 hours with ANC enabled. The Razer Hammerhead V2 matches those 20 hours, but it’s with both ANC and Razer Chroma lighting both enabled. If you disable Chroma lighting, you can get up to 22.5 hours; if you disable ANC, up to 27.5 hours; and if you disable both, you get up to 32.5 hours.

Another improvement the Razer Hammerhead V2 borrow from the Pro model is the fully in-ear design with rubber eartips. That means these should be much more secure in your ear than your original model, though the Hammerhead Pro included seven different eartip sizes, while Hammerhead V2 only includes three.

As usual, the earbuds can be managed with the Razer Audio app for either Android or iOS. This lets you set the Chroma RGB lighting you want, adjust what features you want to assign to certain shortcuts, and so on. The earbuds also support Google Fast Pair to make it faster to connect them to your Android phone.

In terms of more technical specs, the Razer Hammerhead V2 are similar to the Hammerhead Pro.

Razer Hammerhead V2 Specs

Headphones

  • Frequency Response: 20 Hz – 20 kHz
  • Impedance: 16 Ω
  • Sensitivity: 91 db @ 1 mW / 1 kHz
  • Input power: 5 mW (max input)
  • Drivers: 10 mm
  • Connection: Bluetooth 5.2
  • Weight: 53 g

Microphone

  • Pickup pattern: Omnidirectional
  • Signal-to-noise ratio: 64 dB
  • Sensitivity (@1kHz): -26 dBFS

Compatibility

  • Devices with Bluetooth audio capability
  • Smartphone app available for Android and iOS
  • Supported Codecs: SBC, AAC

Battery life

  • Lighting OFF / ANC OFF: Up to 32.5 hours: 6.5 hours on earbuds + 26 hours from case (4 recharges of earbuds)
    Tested with iOS device at 50% volume.
  • Lighting ON / ANC OFF: Up to 27.5 hours: 5.5 hours on earbuds + 22 hours from case (4 recharges of earbuds)
    Tested with iOS device at 50% volume and brightness on Breathing effect.
  • Lighting OFF / ANC ON: Up to 22.5 hours: 4.5 on earbuds + 18 hours from case (4 recharges of earbuds)
    Tested with iOS device at 50% volume and Active Noise Cancellation on.
  • Lighting ON / ANC ON: Up to 20 hours: 4 hours on earbuds + 16 hours from case (4 recharges of earbuds)
    Tested with iOS device at 50% volume and brightness on Breathing effect and Active Noise Cancellation on.

The Razer Hammerhead True Wireless V2 cost $129.99, and they’re available today on Razer’s website and authorized resellers.

Razer also introduced a series of keyboard accessories for those interested in customizing their desktop setup. First, there’s the Razer Phantom Keycap Upgrade Set. This is a set of 128 ABS keycaps that come in either black or white. The keycaps feature half-translucent design so RGB lighting can shine through more easily. The keycaps are compatible with most of Razer’s own keyboard, but they should also fit most cross-shaped axis switches. This set is available for $34.99 on Razer.com, with other resellers getting them a month from now.

Razer Phantom Keycaps

There’s also the Razer PBT Keycap + Coiled Cable Upgrade Set. This includes a set of 120 PBT keycaps – not 128, making it incomplete for 65% keyboard layouts. Unlike the model above, these keycaps are almost fully opaque, but the key legends are translucent, so you get a more subtle RGB effect. Additionally, these come in four color options: black, white, green, and pink. This set also includes a USB Type-C to Type-A cable, which is coiled, in case you find the full length to be too much. The cable is braided, too. The whole set costs $49.99, and it’s available from Razer and other resellers.

Razer PBT Keycaps and Coil Cable

Finally, there are ergonomic wrist rests for keyboards. Some of Razer’s keyboards already come with wrist rests, but if yours didn’t and you want to add one, you now have that option. There’s a standard edition that uses a plush leatherette memory foam cushion, and that comes in three sizes: mini (for 60% designs), tenkeyless, and full-sized. If you want something a little fancier, the Pro edition uses a cooling gel-infused cushion that should keep your hands fresh during longer sessions. However, this version is only available for full-sized keyboards. The standard Razer Ergonomic Wrist Rest costs $19.99, while the Pro model costs $34.99. It’s available today from Razer and other resellers.

About author

João Carrasqueira
João Carrasqueira

Writer at XDA Computing. I've been covering the world of technology since 2018, but I've loved the field for a lot longer. And I have a weird affinity for Nintendo videogames, which I'm always happy to talk about.