ROG Phone II AirTriggers and Armoury Crate now work on AOSP ROMs

ROG Phone II AirTriggers and Armoury Crate now work on AOSP ROMs

The ASUS ROG Phone II is one of the best Android phones for gaming, even with the company’s slow software update track record. However, many of the phone’s custom features aren’t available if you install a custom ROM, including the Armory Crate dashboard and touch trigger buttons. Thankfully, that’s starting to change.

OmniROM for the ROG Phone II was released last week, bringing Android 11 to the phone for the first time — the stock software is still on Android 10. The OmniROM team isn’t stopping there, as the latest nightly build includes two software components from the stock ROM. The Armory Crate dashboard, which serves as a game launcher and info panel for the phone’s gaming functions, is now available. Perhaps more importantly, the phone’s AirTriggers are now working under OmniROM, so you can use the ultrasonic buttons on the ROG Phone II in games.

As you can see in the screenshots below, you can access AirTriggers settings from within Armoury Crate or within OmniROM’s settings. Either way, you can customize the short squeeze or long squeeze actions to perform different actions. You can also adjust the sensitivity of the squeeze or side buttons in settings.

Those features have been missing on the handful of custom ROMs available for the ROG Phone II. It’s always great to see the drawbacks to custom ROMs go away, and losing stock features is sometimes a dealbreaker — especially in the case of ASUS’ heavily-modified build of Android.

ASUS ROG Phone II Forums

If you’re interested in trying out OmniROM for the ROG Phone II, check out the forum thread for installation instructions and support. OmniROM 11 is also available for the ROG Phone 3 (though without AirTrigger/Armory Crate, for now), ZenFone 6, ZenFone 7, Raspberry Pi 4, OnePlus 7 Pro, OnePlus 7T, Redmi K20 Pro, and various Motorola devices.

About author

Corbin Davenport
Corbin Davenport

Corbin is a tech journalist and software developer based in Raleigh, North Carolina. He's also written for Android Police and PC Gamer. Get in touch with him at [email protected]