Samsung Galaxy A53 5G now available in the United States

Samsung Galaxy A53 5G now available in the United States

Samsung revealed the Galaxy A53 last month as the company’s new mid-range smartphone, competing with phones like the Pixel 5A and iPhone SE 3 (2022). Now the phone is available to purchase from Samsung’s own store and multiple carriers in the United States.

The Galaxy A53 5G can now be bought at Samsung.com for $449.99, with an estimated shipping date of next week (at least for my location in North Carolina). The carrier-unlocked model is the same price as the carrier versions, and you can get up to $100 off with a trade-in. Samsung is also throwing in free Galaxy Buds Live, which the company does for nearly every phone release at this point.

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    Samsung's newest mid-range smartphone is available to purchase in the United States. It costs $449.99.

Buy Galaxy A53 5G UW at VerizonBuy Galaxy A53 5G at AT&TBuy Galaxy A53 5G at T-Mobile

Verizon is selling a slightly-different model, the Galaxy A53 5G UW, which costs $50 more and has the ability to connect to Verizon’s mmWave 5G network. Considering the rarity of mmWave 5G, there’s not really a reason to buy the UW model over the regular carrier-unlocked Galaxy A53 from Samsung, unless you have Verizon store credit or some other benefit.

AT&T is selling the regular Galaxy A53 5G for the same $449.99 price as Samsung, with an estimated shipping date of April 11-12 at my location. Finally, T-Mobile is selling the phone for the same $450.00 price.

The Samsung Galaxy A53 5G has IP67 water/dust resistance (so it can handle splashes of water), an Exynos 1280 chipset, a 5,000mAh battery, 25W wired charging, and One UI 4.1 based on Android 12. Samsung is using the Exynos 1280 System-on-a-Chip, instead of the Snapdragon chipsets found in the US version of last year’s Galaxy A52 5G. The Galaxy A53 has the same update promise as Samsung’s flagship phones, with four years of major OS upgrades and five years of security updates. There aren’t any other mid-range phones in the US with that same long support life, except the iPhone SE series.

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Corbin Davenport
Corbin Davenport

Corbin is a tech journalist and software developer. Check out what he's up to at corbin.io.

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