Samsung Galaxy S9/S9+ and Galaxy A51 receive One UI 2.5 with October 2020 security patches

Samsung Galaxy S9/S9+ and Galaxy A51 receive One UI 2.5 with October 2020 security patches

Samsung has gotten considerably better at delivering updates to its phones in the last few years. The Korean OEM recently rolled out the One UI 2.5 update to the Galaxy A71 and the Galaxy Note 9. Now, the company has started pushing the stable version of One UI 2.5 to the Galaxy S9, Galaxy S9+, and the Galaxy A51.

Galaxy S9 Series

We knew One UI 2.5 was headed to the Galaxy S9 series as it was reported back in August, and today Samsung is finally making good on its promise. The Exynos 9810-powered global variants of the Galaxy S9 (model number SM-G960F) and the S9+ (model number SM-G965F) are receiving the new update in the form of software version G96xFXXUCFTJ2. The new builds are available for download in the DBT region, which is Samsung’s code for Germany. As expected, the update brings along the October 2020 security patches. It also introduces a new bootloader, which means end users can’t downgrade to a previous build after installing this update.

Samsung Galaxy S9 XDA Forums || Samsung Galaxy S9+ XDA Forums

Galaxy A51

At the time of writing this article, the SM-A515F variant of the Galaxy A51 has secured the One UI 2.5 update in Russia. The new firmware is tagged as A515FXXU4CTJ1 and carries the October 2020 security patches. We are unable to get our hands on the complete changelog of this update, but the build number is enough to conclude that the bootloader version has been incremented.

Samsung Galaxy A51 XDA Forums

Since Samsung prefers to conduct staged software rollouts, don’t worry if you’re not seeing any OTA notification on your phone just yet. The updates may take several weeks to reach other regional markets, but power users can skip the queue and manually download the new firmware packages directly from the Samsung update server using Frija or Samloader.

About author

Skanda Hazarika
Skanda Hazarika

DIY enthusiast (i.e. salvager of old PC parts). An avid user of Android since the Eclair days, Skanda also likes to follow the recent development trends in the world of single-board computing.