Sunday Debate: Android vs. The Competition — How Can Android Secure Victory?

Sunday Debate: Android vs. The Competition — How Can Android Secure Victory?

Join us in a fun Sunday Debate on Android's Competition. Come with your opinions and feel free to read some of our thoughts, then pick your side or play devil’s advocate to get your voice heard and engage in friendly discussion. You can read our food-for-thought or jump straight into the fray below!

Android has had a good run these past couple of years; Google made sure their mobile platform remained at the forefront of emerging markets through optimized Android releases starting with KitKat.

The company also invested in Android One, and due to Android’s nature, it was also the top choice for OEMs tackling the new demand. Now there is no shortage of Android smartphones for all sorts of people on all price brackets — “be together, not the same” is something Android lives by. But despite all the options, and the amazing potential of each and every Android phone, there are giants looming in the horizon attempting to grab Google’s pie. Microsoft and Apple, and their own mobile platforms, have also been growing significantly in various ways.

With Windows 10 spanning across Microsoft products and Apple keeping a tight hold on their ludicrous profits, how can Android – and its loyal OEMs – secure victory and/or healthy revenue?

  • What is Android’s biggest threat right now?
  • What are Android’s strengths over the competition?
  • Are those enough to secure victory?
  • What features and services should Android prioritize?
  • What is the next step for Android in such a competitive context?

Join the discussion!

A Connected World

Microsoft’s Windows 10 attempts to unify various Microsoft devices and services with a vision that is slightly different from Android’s. Google is also trying to stay on top of the internet of things, emerging markets, and what not, but Microsoft’s approach is different as it offers an even more homogeneous solution that also allows products like phones to serve other purposes. Meanwhile, Google keeps splitting Android into separate products with Android TV, Android Wear, Android Auto, and the like — all good in their own right, but arguably not as polished as Microsoft’s vision.

Google is also coming forth with Marshmallow, an OS upgrade that focuses around Google Services more than any other. Things like Now-on-Tap prove to be ingenious and useful offerings that few companies can truly match, but Google is also falling behind in terms of traditional functionality to enhance multi-tasking and continuity. Apple and Microsoft see this as a big deal, and both companies have adopted productivity-oriented approaches to both software and hardware in 2015. This is very clear when one takes a look at the three companies’ tablet offerings — the iPad Pro, Surface Pro 4 and the Pixel C.

Finally, the competition doesn’t miss a chance to flaunt over its advantages. Despite Google’s efforts, Microsoft and Apple still have the upper hand when it comes to software updates, an issue that Google is still trying to address through their security patches amidst periodic vulnerability findings. Apple also retains the high-end flagship market and continuously makes advancements in key areas consumers care about, like performance, battery life and camera quality. Microsoft, instead, attempts to offer a package that creates perfect synergy with various other products. Google’s approach to the internet of things and mobile is promising nonetheless, but one must reckon that the competition is picking up.

Debating

Google is still evolving our favorite platform, but after a rough year for Android flagships and a no mainstream adoption for other Android branches like Wear (once again), some are skeptical that Google might be slowing down on Android in favor of its Google Services. The platform itself remains highly relevant, and Marshmallow brings legitimate improvements. But it can’t be ignored that Microsoft and Apple keep ramping up as well, and big releases like Windows 10 have the potential to change the battlefield in the long run.

  • What is Android’s biggest threat right now?
  • What are Android’s strengths over the competition?
  • Are those enough to secure victory?
  • What features and services should Android prioritize?
  • What is the next step for Android in such a competitive context?

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