Windows 10 leak hints at design changes borrowed from Microsoft’s cancelled Windows 10X

Windows 10 leak hints at design changes borrowed from Microsoft’s cancelled Windows 10X

In case you missed the news, Windows 10X was canceled. Windows 10X was supposed to be a new “light” operating system from Microsoft, which, instead of being based on their existing Windows 10 code, was built from the ground up. It was initially meant for dual-screen devices (which weren’t a thing then and aren’t really a thing now), but then this restriction was lifted and it was pitched more as a competitor to light operating systems like Chrome OS for affordable computers. It also came with some notably different design choices to regular Windows 10. While the Windows 10X train might never leave the station, users who were fans of these UI changes might be glad to know some of them might make their way to Windows 10.

Windows Latest, a website focused on Windows, has got its hands on what appears to be screenshots and GIFs of Windows 10’s upcoming Sun Valley update, and it shows a few key UI changes to several parts of the Windows UI. One of them is a change on Windows 10’s Action Center, including the ability to swipe up and down on the bottom Quick Settings toggles to reveal or hide them. As of right now, it doesn’t really look all that different from the existing Action Center, although we’ll have to see if further improvements arrive in later builds.

The revamped Action Center in action. Image credits: Windows Latest

Other design elements leaked previously include floating menus with rounded corners, which apply to jump lists, but it won’t be the only place we’ll see them. According to the same Windows Latest scoop, Microsoft accidentally shared a screenshot of an upcoming feature for developers that included a Windows app dialog box with rounded corners. This new design might apply to confirmation dialogs, warning and alert dialogs, and other dialog boxes within Windows.

Sun Valley is expected to launch by the end of this year as update 21H2, and it’s set to be one of the biggest Windows 10 updates since it was first released.

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Arol Wright
Arol Wright

Diehard technology enthusiast, and an Android purist by nature. While I have a soft spot for smartphones, I'm deeply interested in everything techy, be it PCs, gaming consoles, gadgets, you name it. Please direct all inquiries/tips to [email protected]