YouTube TV wants more of your money for 4K streaming and offline downloads

YouTube TV wants more of your money for 4K streaming and offline downloads

Google’s Internet TV service, YouTube TV, has had a rough few years. YouTube TV started off in 2017 with a handful of channels at an affordable price of $35 per month, but as more channels were added (and networks wanted a bigger piece of the pie), the price slowly increased. The service now costs a whopping $64.99/mo, and now Google is introducing a new tier that’s even more expensive.

Google is introducing a new ‘4K Plus’ tier on YouTube TV, which includes the ability to watch content in 4K instead of the usual 1080p resolution. However, a new support article confirms that 4K is only for “select live and on-demand content” from Discovery, ESPN, FOX Sports, FX, Nat Geo, NBC Sports, and Tastemade. You’ll also need a TV or streaming device with 4K playback enabled for YouTube TV, such as the Chromecast with Google TV, 4K Roku devices, the 2021 Apple TV 4K, PlayStation 4 Pro, or Amazon Fire 4K Stick.

The 4K Plus package also includes the ability to download shows to watch offline. “Take your DVR with you,” Google said, “and never worry about missing your favorite shows while you’re without data or traveling on the go. With 4K Plus, we’re introducing the ability to save recordings from your library to your phone or tablet to watch offline.” Finally, the option removes the three-stream limit in standard YouTube TV, allowing everyone in your family to watch TV simultaneously (at home, anyway).

The new tier will cost an additional $19.99/mo, bringing the total cost of YouTube TV with 4K and offline support to $85 every month. If you sign up now, Google will give you a one-month free trial, and 11 months after that for $9.99/mo. Fortunately, Google is at least rolling out 5.1 Dolby audio to all members at no additional cost.

YouTube TV: Live TV & more
YouTube TV: Live TV & more
Developer: Google LLC
Price: Free

About author

Corbin Davenport
Corbin Davenport

Corbin is a tech journalist and software developer based in Raleigh, North Carolina. He's also the host of the Tech Tales podcast, which explores the history of the technology industry. Follow him on Twitter at @corbindavenport.