YouTube now rolling video chapters to more devices

YouTube now rolling video chapters to more devices

Videos aren’t quite as easy to skim through as text content, but separating a video into chapters can help. YouTube finally added official support for video chapters last year, built on the platform’s existing timestamp functionality, but the feature still isn’t available for everyone. Now video chapters are arriving on more platforms, according to an announcement from YouTube.

YouTube said in a tweet on Tuesday (via Android Police), “we’re rolling out video chapters on newer Smart TVs and gaming consoles to make it easier for you to jump to moments you’re most interested in!” Before now, chapters only appeared in the mobile apps and desktop website. YouTube didn’t specify which smart TV and console platforms are receiving chapter support, but most YouTube TV apps share the same codebase, so it could be live everywhere after a short rollout.

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YouTube first added support for video chapters last year, which use timestamp information from a video’s description to display a chapter selector. Later in 2020, YouTube started testing AI-generated chapter markers for videos. Some unofficial YouTube players have also implemented support for the functionality — NewPipe added a chapter menu for videos in February of this year.

The official documentation for the feature in YouTube’s support site reads, “video Chapters break up a video into sections, each with an individual preview. Video chapters add info and context to each portion of the video and let you easily rewatch different parts of the video. Creators can add their own video chapters for each uploaded video or rely on automatic video chapters. Creators can also opt out of automatic video chapters in YouTube Studio.”

More recently, YouTube announced last month that it would hide public dislike counts on videos. YouTube Music is also changing its feature set to more closely mirror competitors like Spotify, with on-demand music selection and unlimited skips now requiring a paid subscription in some countries.

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Corbin Davenport
Corbin Davenport

Corbin is a tech journalist and software developer. Check out what he's up to at corbin.io.

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